What is Near Future Garden?

Near Future Garden was a Conceptual Garden at the RHS Hampton Court Flower Show from July 5th to 10th 2016.

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This environmental garden conveyed the importance of using earth’s natural elements to ensure a low carbon future.

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Inspirational garden design has the potential to impact on its audience. Near Future Garden was seen by 1.2 million viewers on BBC2 and over 10,000 visitors walked on NFG Carbon Path during six days of RHS Hampton.

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See the Near Future Garden exhibitor information on the RHS website.

About the garden

Visitors entered Near Future Garden garden via a specially designed Carbon Path impregnated with footprints of famous Climate Champions.

This led to a vortex of black “oil”, slowly draining away as we burn fossil fuels, depleting the earth of the essential carbon that it needs to balance increasing emissions.

Near Future Garden vortex of 'oil'

Wooden sculptures represented Nature’s powerful elements; the sun, wind and water. Each element called man to harness these natural sources of energy to power the world now to ensure the legacy of a low carbon future.

Near Future Garden

The drought-tolerant planting scheme showed one possible extreme weather scenario – is this a possible garden of the ‘Near Future’?

Near Future Garden planting

Read more about Near Future Garden

How is Near Future Garden inspiring change?

A key aim from the beginning for NFG was to limit the environmental foot-print of this Conceptual Garden. NFG encouraged visitors to follow this example and think about how they can achieve the same in their own gardens and homes.

GroChar by Carbon GoldAll of the plants on Near Future Garden were planted in peat free soil using 100% Enriched Biochar from Carbon Gold.

Carbon Gold estimate that if we increase by 4% (0.4%) a year the quantity of carbon in soils, we can halt the annual increase in C02 in the atmosphere, which is a major contributor to the greenhouse effect and climate change.

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